Collaboration Guide

Collaboration Guide

Collaboration Guide This Collaboration Guide is intended to be used to help Live Ideas project teams develop shared intent, and outline the expected benefits, expectations, roles and responsibilities of all parties in the collaboration. This document is not a legal agreement. Why collaboration? Collaborating with community and industry partners provides important outcomes for students including the development of skills and knowledge of relevant research approaches andproject management. Students experience first-hand the processes of negotiation & communication by responding to clients needs whilst also meeting academic expectations. In addition to providing rich learning contexts, these experiences help to develop career wise and employability mindsets, a students professional identity and establish important professional networks. Community and industry organisations benefit from research partnerships in a number of ways. Or staff and students have skills and experiences that are relevant to community organisations and industry and todays students are tomorrows valued employees. Via collaboration with Southern Cross University community and industry groups can gain access to resources to support their programs and initiatives enabling them in some cases to Sustain or expand upon established programs. Learning about the effectiveness of processes and programs they currently deliver. Finally, for collaborative research, demonstrating competence as a research grant partner may assist obtain additional funding. When meeting with staff from community-based organizations, they may have some fundamental questions about what you do and what you would like to do. Six principles underpin the process of collaborative engagement with partners and Live Ideas project teams (Figure 1). These principles have been incorporated throughout this Collaboration Guide to help frame discussions, and enable mutually agreement on the background, intent, expected benefits, expectations, roles and responsibilities of all parties in the collaboration. Figure 1: Six Guiding Principles for Collaborative Engagement THE COLLABORATION MODEL When in doubt: reflect & communicate What is our purpose? Reach mutual agreement on the project scope. How do we build trust? What processes will we use to build trust, consensus & agreement. What does it mean? Reflection. Did we achieve what we set out to achieve? What changed and why? How did the process work? How do we relate? Communication framework, guidelines, reflection. What do we need? Resources, what do we need? Who can contribute what, gaps what is missing? How do we arrange? Explore team responsibilities, roles, skills, timelines. The Model for Engaged Learning and Teaching (MELT) pentagon is based on the six facets of the RSD as modified for Optimising Problem Solving (OPS) pentagon designed by Mechanical Engineering Communications Tutors, University of Adelaide, 2014. See www.rsd.edu.au for full version of RSD and http://www.adelaide.edu.au/rsd/framework/frameworks/ for OPS john.willison@adelaide.edu.au The MELT Pentagon may be used as a Thinking Routine (R. Ritchhart & D. Perkins, 2008). LIVE IDEAS Live Ideas (www.liveideas.org.au) displays project ideas that have been submitted by partner organisations and approved by the Live Ideas team. Each project idea is based on the specific needs of a partner organisation. The Live Ideas team liaise with partners to assist working up possible project ideas. Once they are published on Live Ideas they are ready to go. Please see our Frequently Asked Questions (http://scu.edu.au/liveideas) for further information. Project Information It is important to develop shared/common ideas around the basics of the projects such as: The title of the projectAims of the projectExpected outcomes in terms of the partner, the student & the UniversityWhat are the anticipated benefitsHow will you know (identify success measures) Resourcing It is important to discuss with your partner: How will resources be allocated to the partnership activities?Who will be responsible? Include any additional information you feel is relevant for examplewill any refreshments be provided to the participants? Will participants be reimbursed for travel costs? What other contributions are being made to the project? Who are they being made by? Key strengths and assets [Describe the specific strengths and assets each of the partners brings to the partnership and how they relate to their specific contributions to the project] Project Planning To ensure everyone knows what needs to be done to ensure the project moves from idea to outcome it is important to identify key tasks or milestones. Part of this includes decide on who is responsible for each task and when the tasks need to be completed by (eg due dates). Identifying project outputs is another critical element of project planning. You might like to discuss for each intended output, who will own it; how will contributions be acknowledged and the audience the output is intended for (eg who will see it). Communication Describe the arrangements made for ongoing communication between the community organisation and the student/s. Indicate who is responsible for initiating contact, through what mode (face-to-face; phone; email etc.), how often and in which location. Describe the arrangements made for ongoing communication between the community organisation and the University (both lecturer and Community Engagement). Indicate who is responsible for initiating contact, through what mode (face-to-face; phone; email etc.), how often and in which location. Reflecting on your experience Describe how a process of ongoing reflection by all partners will be incorporated into the project. Monitoring progress Describe the process by which student progress will be reviewed on a regular basis to ensure tasks are being carried out and milestones met, as well as to be alert to any difficulties arising in the partnership. Indicate how the partnership will obtain feedback on the experience for students, the community partner and SCU staff Managing Risks Describe how the partnership intends to manage disagreements or conflicts, including cases where a partner or student is failing to meet expectations. Include plans to ensure student safety in the community environment. If youintend to collect information from people and intend to analyse this informationor ifyour project involve a minority groups, or requires that participants to travel or poses any risks to participants then your project is likely to require approval from SCUs Human Research Ethics Committee. Please discuss this with the Unit Assessor involved. Low Risk Research To assist in identifying whether your research is eligible for expedited review and is low risk research, refer to the following examples: Social science questionnaires on non-controversial, non-personal issues.Social science questionnaires on non-controversial, non-personal issues.Social science questionnaires on non-controversial, non-personal issues.Interviews involving non-personal or non-intrusive information.Observation studies in public situations which focus on non-sensitive issues.Studies of existing de-identified data, documents, records, pathological or diagnostic specimens.Studies that do not involve an intervention that could result in significant harm to participants.Collection of certain biological specimens, including hair, nail clippings or saliva.Applications for approval of amendments to previously approved research protocols and studies that are substantially similar to another study already approved. For External Ethics approval for SCU HREC ratification download the Minimising Duplication of Ethical Review Form. For Q&A Evaluation research on behalf of external clients of the University download the Q&A Evaluation Ethics Application Form. These forms and other documents are available at: Human Ethics Research forms Visit SCUs Ethics and Research webpage for more information. http://scu.edu.au/research/index.php/40 Working with children If you will be working with children during your project then it is also a requirement that you obtain a working with children check. Will this project require a Working with Children check: https://www.nationalcrimecheck.com.au/police-checks-individuals/resources/working_with_children_checks_in_australia Further information Please see our Frequently Asked Questions (http://scu.edu.au/liveideas) for further information or email the team at Live Ideas liveideas@scu.edu.au with any enquiries. Live Ideas Collaboration Guide A Checklist This Collaboration Guide describes the background, intent, expected benefits, expectations, roles and responsibilities of all parties in the collaboration. It is a true reflection of collaborative decisions made during the initial planning process. If you require extra space please attach additional pages. Project title:You can use the project title from Live Ideas or something that identifies your part of the project Description of projectDescribe the industry/community need the project is addressing and how it will be addressed. For example, The Lismore Lantern Parade was established twenty five years ago and continues to grow in participation as audience members and groups in the parade. Its success also attracts a wide interest from Schools interested in participating, although staff may not have the experience in making lanterns. The Lismore Lantern Parade would like to offer schools lantern making workshops but do not have sufficient numbers of volunteers to facilitate these workshops. They are interested in attracting volunteers who are working in education studies to work with the schools to conduct workshops and support to record a manual that can be provided to volunteers for the future.Project scopeDescribe the expected scope of the project and how it fits in with a larger community project, if applicable.The scope is described in Live Ideas, however, your project needs to be completed within one session of study and could be undertaken independently or in a group. The scope describes the larger project but also identifies your specific role within that, which is feasible to complete with the resources you have available within a session of study.Aims of the project Outline the agreed aims of the project. Lists or dot points are fine.The aim is your overall intention for the project. It describes the reason why you are doing the project and where you hope to be by the end.Expected outcomes and benefits For the partner, for the student & or the UniversityOutcomes are the benefits or other long- term changes that are sought from doing the project. It describes the benefits of the project (rather than outputs which are the tangible services, results or materials the partner is provided.What does the partner want at the end? What is it you want to learn or experience? Are there any outcomes that the university want? (eg. Successfully completing the unit, maintaining the reputation of the university).Success measuresHow do you know you have succeeded in meeting the aims of the project? Is it increased participation or attendance? The use of the resources in a public forum or by the organisation? Positive feedback? Overcoming a challenge or problem?Resourcing arrangements: How will resources be allocated to the partnership activities? Who will be responsible?Are there any resources required to do the project? For example transport, printing costs, paid staff, production of artwork, ticketing to attend an event? Any resources needed should be discussed with your partner and an agreement reached about how these are provided if they are essential.Please include any additional information you feel is relevant:e.g. will any refreshments be provided to the participants? Will participants be reimbursed for travel costs? Will you need to delay submission of the final project in line with the event you are going to be involved with? Key tasks and milestones Task/milestoneWho is responsibleDue dateInclude here not only the assessment due dates, but any meetings required, stages that are necessary to complete in order to achieve the aims Project outputs OutputWho will own itHow contributions will be acknowledgedWho will see itEg. Workshop manualLantern ParadeSouthern Cross support will be acknowledged, students name will be printed on the publicationLantern Parade volunteers, schools engaged with the workshops Key strengths and assets [Describe the specific strengths and assets each of the partners brings to the partnership and how they relate to their specific contributions to the project] PartnerStrengths and assetsHow these assets contribute to the projectCommunity organisation:SCU lecturer:generic examplesExperienced community engaged researcher; Has taught the unit for three years; Has made availability clear for consultation; Uses Collaborate session and class times for problem solving and interactivity.Understands the potential and challenges of community engaged research; Will contribute resources to support the project; Requires preparation for classes to maximise their potential.Students/s:SCU Community Engagement: generic examplesResponsibility for Live Ideas; Understands community demands and expectations of the university; Long term experience working with community.Support to access projects and negotiation; understanding of community needs; Expertise with collaboration Partner contributions Student/sI/we undertake to: [list student contributions for the duration of the project, including professional responsibilities and expectations]Community organisationI/we undertake to: [list community partner tasks and responsibilities for the duration of the project, including appropriate orientation of students to the organisation]SCU lecturerI/we undertake to: [list academic tasks and responsibilities for the duration of the project, including appropriate preparation and guidance for ongoing reflection]SCU Community EngagementI/we undertake to: [list CE tasks and responsibilities for the duration of the project, including support for the partnership] Communication, reflection, monitoring and evaluation processes Project communicationDescribe the arrangements made for ongoing communication between the community organisation and the student/s. Indicate who is responsible for initiating contact, through what mode (face-to-face; phone; email etc.), how often and in which location.Partnership communicationDescribe the arrangements made for ongoing communication between the community organisation and the University (both lecturer and Community Engagement). Indicate who is responsible for initiating contact, through what mode (face-to-face; phone; email etc.), how often and in which location.Reflecting on your experienceDescribe how a process of ongoing reflection by all partners will be incorporated into the project.Monitoring progressDescribe the process by which student progress will be reviewed on a regular basis to ensure tasks are being carried out and milestones met, as well as to be alert to any difficulties arising in the partnership.Feedback on the experienceIndicate how the partnership will obtain feedback on the experience for students, the community partner and SCU staff. Ethics Please tick yes or no to the following questions in relation to your Live Ideas project: Do you intend to collect information from people? Yes No Do you intend to analyse this information? Yes No Does your project involve a minority group? Yes No Does your project require that participants to travel? Yes No Does your project pose any risks to participants? Yes No If you ticked Yes to one or more of the questions above then this project is likely to require approval from SCUs Human Research Ethics Committee. Please discuss this with the Unit Assessor involved. Visit SCUs Ethics and Research webpage for more information. http://scu.edu.au/research/index.php/32 Even if you answered no to the above questions please describe below how you intend to manage any foreseen risks associated with the project: Managing risksDescribe how the partnership intends to manage disagreements or conflicts, including cases where a partner or student is failing to meet expectations. Include plans to ensure student safety in the community environment. Working with children Will this project require a Working with Children check? Yes No If yes, please visit the relevant website and submit the relevant forms if you do not already have the need working with children checks for your state: https://www.nationalcrimecheck.com.au/police-checks-individuals/resources/working_with_children_checks_in_australia

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